Menu
 

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

Why have I been contacted about this research?

It’s really important to us and the ONS that our research represents the views of a range of people who have experienced different forms of abuse as children, as well as parents, guardians and professionals.

Taking part is an opportunity to tell influential people what you really think.

You have been contacted about this research because we want to hear about how you think a future survey on child abuse could best be delivered. 

  • If you are a child, you have been invited to take part because we want to know how you and other children might find being asked questions on this topic in a survey. You will not be asked about any personal experiences in relation to abuse.
  • If you are a young adult, you have been asked to participate to share your perspective on what it might be like for young people to be asked questions on the topic of abuse in a survey. You will not be asked about any personal experiences in relation to abuse.
  • If you are somebody we have contacted about a child, we would like to invite them to take part to explore in an age-appropriate way how they might feel about being asked questions about experiences of child abuse.
  • If you are a parent/guardian we have invited to take part, we would like to speak to you about how you would feel about your child participating in a survey on child abuse. In particular, we want to ensure that the research includes the views of parents whose children are victims and survivors of abuse so that the needs of children who may be asked to complete a national survey in future are fully considered.
  • If you have been invited to participate in a professional capacity, we would like to hear your thoughts on options for administering the survey, including ethical and practical considerations relating to local procedures, resource requirements, and approaches to inclusion of particular groups of children, as well as any other key benefits, challenges and considerations.

You will not be asked specific questions about any experiences of abuse you or any children you know may have had. Instead, the discussion will focus on your general views about how a survey might work and what challenges and opportunities you think there could be in carrying out a representative survey on child abuse.