Menu
 

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

Filter Search

Filter alphabetically:

  • First name
  • Last name
  • All
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Z
Frances Shipsey

Frances Shipsey

Research Assistant

Health and Social Care

Frances is a Research Assistant in the Health and Social Care Team.

Since joining NatCen in 2019 Frances has contributed to qualitative and quantitative research projects, and to rapid evidence assessments (REAs). She has experience of depth interviews, focus groups, and deliberative workshops and of secondary data analysis. Frances has worked on REAs on the profile of e-cigarette use, on vulnerability in decision making in the funerals market, and on challenges to accessing transport among people living with disabilities. She has conducted secondary data analysis on access to transport and mobility aids among people living with disabilities. Frances has contributed to qualitative research on patient experiences of a cancer screening programme and on user experiences of the NHS Test and Trace app; she has facilitated focus groups on the future of domestic heating, on food use during the Covid-19 pandemic, and has moderated small group discussions as part of an online deliberative polling event about the future of Britain after Brexit.

Frances gained a MSc in Research Methods from City, University of London in 2020, for which her dissertation was a qualitative research study of different-sex couples in long-term relationships who had decided against marriage, in the context of new legislation on civil partnerships. She also holds a MA in Library and Information Studies from UCL in 1988. Before re-training in social research methods and joining NatCen, Frances practised as an academic librarian in university and research libraries in London for over thirty years. Her professional interests were in library users’ information-seeking behaviours and the usability and accessibility of online and digital information resources.

Download Frances's vCard