Menu
 

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

Understanding multiple disadvantage in older age

TMitchell_120907_3114
Published: January 2009

Aim

We explored the interrelationship between disadvantages to identify groups of older people that share particular combinations of disadvantages.

Findings

We found five groups of older people who shared the same kinds of disadvantage:

5% experienced more disadvantages than any other group (five on average), predominantly related to access problems, such as:

  • poor access to services and to transport
  • physically inactivity
  • fear of their area after dark
  • lack social support
  • poor literacy and numeracy skills

They were typically women, aged 80 and older, unmarried and living alone and were likely to rent their home.

7% of older people experienced four disadvantages on average, which were predominantly characterised by poor health.

These older people were likely to have

  • poor general and emotional health
  • housing problems
  • poor access to services
  • fear of their area after dark

Older people in this group typically had no qualifications and were likely to rent their home.

3% of older people had an average of three disadvantages and their experience of multiple disadvantage was principally characterised by low income.

  • fear of their area after dark
  • lack social support

These individuals were typically women, aged 80 and older, were unmarried and lived alone and rented their home.

12% of older people experienced two or three disadvantages on average:

  • fear of their local area after dark

  • have poor literacy and numeracy skills
  • lack social support

They were typically women, were unmarried, and rented their home.

10% of older people experienced two or three disadvantages on average, which were characterised by loneliness and low social support.

These individuals also had housing problems and low political efficacy. They were typically men and unmarried.

Methodology

Using data from 4,523 older people aged 60 and over, collected as part of the 2004 (English Longitudinal Study of Ageing), we used Latent Class Analysis to gain insights into the interrelationships between disadvantages and group together older people with similar combinations of disadvantages.

Newsletter Banner

Read the report