Menu
 

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

Public attitudes to housing in England

TMitchell_130308_9811
Published: July 2011

Aim

This report, commissioned by DCLG, looks at what people in England really think about a range of housing issues and their aspirations, expectations and experiences in relation to housing.

Findings

There is a continued preference for home ownership among the vast majority of the public

  • 86% of the public would prefer to buy, a figure which has remained unchanged since the mid-1990s (85% in 1996).
  • The main advantages of owning a home are that it is seen as a good investment (26%); more secure than renting (23%); and gives you the freedom to do what you want with it (21%).

The majority of renters say they would prefer to buy

  • If they had a free choice, 68% of renters would choose to buy, but only 17% expect to buy in the near future.
  • The majority of all three ‘renter’ groups would prefer to buy rather than rent: 77% of private tenants; 61% of housing association tenants; and 58% of local authority tenants.

Fewer people now would advise a newly married couple to buy a home as soon as possible

  • 54% would advise a newly married couple to buy a home as soon as possible, down from 71% in 2004.
  • 45% expect house prices in their local area to go up in the next year. This is up from just 22% in 2008.

Most people find it easy to meet their mortgage payments

  • 79% say it is easy to meet their mortgage payments, and 68% say they never worry about not being able to pay the mortgage.

Only about 3 in 10 would support new homes being built in the local area

  • Overall, 28% would support new homes being built in the local area, while 46% would oppose this.
  • Strongest support comes from people living in a big city (42%), compared to 29% of people in the suburbs of a big city, 27% of those in a small city or town, and 24% of those living in a country village.

Methodology

This report analyses data from the 2010 British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey.

Read the report