Menu
 

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

Multiple disadvantage in Scotland

Housing estate
Published: October 2012

Aim

We wanted to find out about the extent of multiple disadvantages in Scotland. We identified a minority of households that experience four or more indicators of disadvantage, including low income, overcrowding, mental health problems and living in a deprived neighbourhood.  We compared rates of multiple disadvantage across local areas and the characteristics of households most at risk.

Findings

  • 24,000 families with children (4 per cent) experience multiple disadvantage.
  • Unmarried households with children are six times more likely to be severely disadvantaged than married households.
  • As to be expected, some forms of disadvantage are more prevalent for particular life stages. Families have higher rates of overcrowding, working age adults have higher rates of unemployment and pensioner households are worse-off health wise.
  • Glasgow is the worst affected area with 1 in 10 families with children severely disadvantaged.
  • South Lanarkshire had the second highest rate of families with children with four or more disadvantages.
  • The local area with the highest proportion of households without any disadvantages was Edinburgh
  • Other areas with high proportions of households without any disadvantages were the Highlands, Grampian and Central.

Method

We conducted a secondary analysis of the data from the Scottish Household Survey (SHS), a large-scale survey of the characteristics, attitudes and behaviour of Scottish households and individuals on a range of issues, including social justice, housing and transport.

Read the report